FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS

 

GARDASIL 9

 
What happens if I already have HPV?

You should talk to your doctor. Even if you’ve been infected with one type of HPV, it may not be too late to help protect yourself from certain cancers caused by other types of the virus covered by the vaccine to which you haven’t been exposed to yet. Infection with one type of HPV does not prevent infection with another type. GARDASIL 9 does not treat HPV infection.

 
Who can receive the HPV vaccine?

GARDASIL 9 is indicated in girls and women, and boys and men 9 through 45 years of age.

 
Is the same vaccine given to both men and women?

Yes. GARDASIL 9 is indicated for girls and women ages 9 to 45 as well as boys and men ages 9 to 45.

 
How safe is GARDASIL 9?

Who should not get GARDASIL 9

Anyone who has an allergic reaction to a previous dose of GARDASIL or GARDASIL 9 or is allergic to the ingredients of GARDASIL 9, including those severely allergic to yeast, should not receive the vaccine. GARDASIL 9 is not for women who are pregnant.

Possible side effects of GARDASIL 9

The most common side effects include pain, swelling, redness, itching, bruising, bleeding, and a lump where you got the shot, headache, fever, nausea, dizziness, tiredness, diarrhea, abdominal pain, and sore throat. Fainting can happen after getting GARDASIL 9. Sometimes people who faint can fall and hurt themselves. For this reason, your health care professional may ask you to sit or lie down for 15 minutes after getting GARDASIL 9. Some people who faint might shake or become stiff.

For more information on GARDASIL 9, talk to your doctor or health care professional.

 
Can I get GARDASIL 9 if I’ve already gotten GARDASIL?

If you’ve already gotten GARDASIL, talk to your doctor or health care professional to see if GARDASIL 9 is right for you.

 
Could I get HPV or any disease caused by HPV from GARDASIL 9?

No. It is not possible to get HPV or any disease caused by HPV from GARDASIL 9.

For more information on GARDASIL 9, talk to your doctor or health care professional.

 
What are the ingredients in GARDASIL 9?

The ingredients are proteins of HPV Types 6, 11, 16, 18, 31, 33, 45, 52, and 58, amorphous aluminum hydroxyphosphate sulfate, yeast protein, sodium chloride, L-histidine, polysorbate 80, sodium borate, and water for injection.

For more information on GARDASIL 9, talk to your doctor or health care professional.

 
Will I still need to get Pap tests?

Yes. Pap tests will continue to play a key role in protecting your health since GARDASIL 9 does not protect against all types of HPV. Pap tests look for abnormal cells in the lining of the cervix.

For more information on GARDASIL 9, talk to your doctor or health care professional.

 
Frequently Asked Questions About HPV in WomenFrequently Asked Questions About HPV in Women

HPV

 
How do men/women get HPV?

You can get infected through any type of sexual activity with someone who has HPV. Intercourse is the most common way people get HPV, but any genital skin-to-skin contact can put you at risk.

 
Do HPV-related cancers and diseases affect men?

Yes. In men, HPV can cause cancer of the anus and genital warts.

 
Is there a way to screen for HPV?

There is no routine HPV test recommended for males.

For some women, a Pap test plus an HPV test (called co-testing) is the preferred way to find early cervical cancers. The HPV test checks for the virus, not cell changes. A Pap test can look for abnormal cells (that are caused by HPV) in the lining of the cervix. A Pap test does not diagnose HPV.

The American College of Obstetrics and Gynecologists (ACOG) recommends that women aged 21–29 years are screened every 3 years for cell abnormalities (Pap test). For women aged 25 years and older, the primary HPV screening test can be considered as an alternative. For women 30 years and older, ACOG recommends getting an HPV test along with a Pap test (co-testing) every 5 years. It is okay to continue to just have a Pap test every 3 years.

 
What is the link between HPV and cervical cancer?

Most cervical cancer is caused by certain types of HPV. When a woman is infected with these types of HPV and the virus doesn't go away on its own, abnormal cells can develop in the cervix. If these abnormal cells are not found early through routine cervical cancer screening and treated, then cervical cancer can develop.

 
What is the link between HPV and genital warts?

Two types of HPV can cause most genital warts. People can get genital warts after having any kind of genital contact with someone who has genital warts.

 
Can HPV infection be treated?

No. There are currently no available medicines that treat HPV infection, but there are treatments for diseases caused by HPV. For most people, HPV clears on its own. But for others who don’t clear the virus, HPV could cause cervical, vaginal, and vulvar cancers in women and anal cancer and genital warts in both men and women.

Talk to your doctor about ways to help protect yourself against certain cancers and other diseases caused by HPV, and ask about the HPV vaccine.

Frequently Asked Questions About HPV in MenFrequently Asked Questions About HPV in Men

While we hope the answers to these questions will be helpful, it’s important to talk to your doctor or health care professional for more information about GARDASIL 9 and HPV. In addition, you can read the Patient Information or the Prescribing Information for GARDASIL 9.

 

INFORMATION ABOUT GARDASIL 9

GARDASIL 9 helps protect individuals ages 9 to 45 against the following diseases caused by 9 types of HPV: cervical, vaginal, and vulvar cancers in females, anal cancer and genital warts in both males and females.

GARDASIL 9 may not fully protect everyone, nor will it protect against diseases caused by other HPV types or against diseases not caused by HPV. GARDASIL 9 does not prevent all types of cervical cancer, so it’s important for women to continue routine cervical cancer screenings. GARDASIL 9 does not treat cancer or genital warts.

GARDASIL 9 is a shot that is usually given in the arm muscle. GARDASIL 9 may be given as 2 or 3 shots.

  • For persons 9 through 14 years of age, GARDASIL 9 can be given using a 2-dose or 3-dose schedule. For the 2-dose schedule, the second shot should be given 6–12 months after the first shot. If the second shot is given less than 5 months after the first shot, a third shot should be given at least 4 months after the second shot. For the 3-dose schedule, the second shot should be given 2 months after the first shot and the third shot should be given 6 months after the first shot.
  • For persons 15 through 45 years of age, GARDASIL 9 is given using a 3-dose schedule; the second shot should be given 2 months after the first shot and the third shot should be given 6 months after the first shot.

The appropriate dosing schedule will be determined by your health care professional.

IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION

Anyone who is allergic to the ingredients of GARDASIL 9 or GARDASIL, including those severely allergic to yeast, should not receive the vaccine. GARDASIL 9 was not studied in women who knew they were pregnant.

The side effects include pain, swelling, redness, itching, bruising, bleeding, and a lump where you got the shot, headache, fever, nausea, and dizziness. Fainting can happen after getting GARDASIL 9. Sometimes people who faint can fall and hurt themselves. For this reason, your health care professional may ask you to sit or lie down for 15 minutes after you get GARDASIL 9. Some people who faint might shake or become stiff.

 

Only a doctor or health care professional can decide if GARDASIL 9 is right for you.

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit www.fda.gov/medwatch or call 1-800-FDA-1088.

Please read the Patient Information for GARDASIL 9 and discuss it with your doctor. The physician Prescribing Information also is available.

Having trouble paying for your Merck vaccine? Merck may be able to help. Visit http://www.merckhelps.com/


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INFORMATION ABOUT GARDASIL 9[OPEN & SCROLL]

GARDASIL 9 helps protect individuals ages 9 to 45 against the following diseases caused by 9 types of HPV: cervical, vaginal, and vulvar cancers in females, anal cancer and genital warts in both males and females.

GARDASIL 9 may not fully protect everyone, nor will it protect against diseases caused by other HPV types or against diseases not caused by HPV. GARDASIL 9 does not prevent all types of cervical cancer,

GARDASIL 9 helps protect individuals ages 9 to 45 against the following diseases caused by 9 types of HPV: cervical, vaginal, and vulvar cancers in females, anal cancer and genital warts in both males and females.

GARDASIL 9 may not fully protect everyone, nor will it protect against diseases caused by other HPV types or against diseases not caused by HPV. GARDASIL 9 does not prevent all types of cervical cancer, so it’s important for women to continue routine cervical cancer screenings. GARDASIL 9 does not treat cancer or genital warts.

GARDASIL 9 is a shot that is usually given in the arm muscle. GARDASIL 9 may be given as 2 or 3 shots.

  • For persons 9 through 14 years of age, GARDASIL 9 can be given using a 2-dose or 3-dose schedule. For the 2-dose schedule, the second shot should be given 6–12 months after the first shot. If the second shot is given less than 5 months after the first shot, a third shot should be given at least 4 months after the second shot. For the 3-dose schedule, the second shot should be given 2 months after the first shot and the third shot should be given 6 months after the first shot.
  • For persons 15 through 45 years of age, GARDASIL 9 is given using a 3-dose schedule; the second shot should be given 2 months after the first shot and the third shot should be given 6 months after the first shot.

The appropriate dosing schedule will be determined by your health care professional.

IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION [OPEN & SCROLL] [OPEN & SCROLL]

Anyone who is allergic to the ingredients of GARDASIL 9 or GARDASIL, including those severely allergic to yeast, should not receive the vaccine. GARDASIL 9 was not studied in women who knew they were pregnant.

The side effects include pain, swelling, redness, itching, bruising, bleeding, and a lump where you got the shot, headache, fever, nausea, and dizziness. Fainting can happen after getting   GARDASIL 9. Sometimes people who faint can fall and hurt themselves.

Anyone who is allergic to the ingredients of  GARDASIL 9 or GARDASIL, including those severely allergic to yeast, should not receive the vaccine. GARDASIL 9 was not studied in women who knew they were pregnant.

The side effects include pain, swelling, redness, itching, bruising, bleeding, and a lump where you got the shot, headache, fever, nausea, and dizziness. Fainting can happen after getting GARDASIL 9. Sometimes people who faint can fall and hurt themselves. For this reason, your health care professional may ask you to sit or lie down for 15 minutes after you get GARDASIL 9. Some people who faint might shake or become stiff.

Only a doctor or health care professional can decide if GARDASIL 9 is right for you.

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit www.fda.gov/medwatch or call 1-800-FDA-1088.

Please read the Patient Information for GARDASIL 9 and discuss it with your doctor. The physician Prescribing Information also is available.

Having trouble paying for your Merck vaccine? Merck may be able to help. Visit http://www.merckhelps.com/